Recent Articles

Agriculture, Human Landscape

Red Soil, Green Gold, Dark Secrets

Red Soil, Green Gold, Dark Secrets

 he bones of deceased Guaraní shamans used to decorate forest pockets in pre-colonial times, when Mata Atlântica, “The Atlantic Forest,” still stretched out its arms across South America. From modern-day northeastern Argentina to the southern Brazilian coast, the “Atlantic …

by × November 7, 2019 × 0 comments

Agriculture, Culture, Politics

San Isidro, Havana, Cuba

Urban Farm-Fed Cities: Lessons from Cuba’s Organopónicos

An intimate portrait of urban farms in Cuba explores the implications for sustainable agriculture and food access for urban communities.
by × November 23, 2018 × 0 comments

Conservation, Culture, Multimedia, Place

Retreat, and a Voice for Wilderness

Retreat, and a Voice for Wilderness

What to do about the problem of access? The environmental concerns of the Adirondacks are global concerns.
by × November 2, 2018 × 0 comments

2018 Print Edition, Photo Essay, Place

Hardwater

Hardwater

An intimate portrait of a community on the extremes.
by × September 18, 2018 × 0 comments

2018 Print Edition, Place, Politics

Danaus gilippus, Queen butterflies on retama [PHOTO CREDIT: National Butterfly Center]

The Other Side: Butterflies and the Border Wall

Exploring the natural beauty and diversity of the Rio Grande Valley, Elizabeth Garcia reflects on what we tear down when a wall is built.
by × August 3, 2018 × 2 comments

2018 Print Edition, Conservation, Fisheries

In the southwest corner of British Columbia, a great river flows  from a canyon in Hope. Hope marks the start of an historic aquatic corridor in the Lower Fraser River Valley. Here the river runs along rich floodplains, through metro Vancouver, and, ultimately, to freedom from the bounds of land at the Salish Sea. For centuries the region has sustained populations of people and wildlife alike, a fertile crescent of the West.

What is Lost and Found on the Fraser River

Through mud-caked and marsh-soaked lenses, a photojournalism team reveals the inseparable link between the survival of a fish and the future of a city.